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20121121
20121129
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CSPAN
Nov 26, 2012 2:00am EST
york news day on third avenue near the united nations and something was happening city hall and john paraskivas one of my colleagues was asked to go down to city hall and file immediately but use this thing because this was the only way to file right away and it was something that was made by a company called leefax out of boston, some guys from and they were making scanning equipment to digitize negatives and take it back to wherever the printing presses were. but at any rate, john literally put on something that locked like a -- looked like scuba diving gear on his back. i kid you not. it was that big. it was a huge backpack and had a cable running into the camera. he transmitted that back to news day and made the paper and it was noisy as hell. it was a very grainy image, very messy image. it was not anything that you would see from film. but at any rate, that is the kind of stuff that people were dealing with 25 years ago. and when digital cameras first came out, i was one of the last who wanted one. >> exactly, i remember. >> because, because, because the images were very n
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 6:30pm EST
mention that because journalism, like foreign policy, is frequently affected by national interest. to the degree that there is a that what happens in the congo is less important to the united states, we don't cover it. we are infinitely more engaged right now in what's happening in syria, but the coverage of what's happening in syria is not bad but i don't know that it's shed a great deal of light and part of the problem is, even there, you were asking about -- i know you began by asking about what's happening in gaza right now and that i what i think of k konk -- coverage of that, i did hear you correctly? >> yes. >> any time israel is involved in a story it, becomes an excruciatingly difficult story for american journalists to cover because there is a -- for the most part -- a natural sympathy in this country, a sense of identity in this country with israelis and many reporters, old friends and colleagues of mine, the late peter jennings, used to, i think, very unfairly be criticized for taking an anti-israeli point of view. it wasn't so much an anti-israeli point of view as that he
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 10:00am EST
limits on government. we've been able to feature some of the nation's most respected judges, legal scholars, lawyers, and policy analysts. the marquee event is tonight's program. the namesake of tonight's lecturer became the youngest associate justice ever to serve on united states supreme court when he was appointed by president madison in 1812. he made a significant mark on american law in his 33 years on the bench, but his greatest contribution is is renowned commentaries on the constitution. justice story a famously and correctly declared "a constitutional government is addressed to the common sense of the people and never was designed for trials of logical skills or visionary speculation." this lecture series celebrates his legacy in the law. prior lectures have been judge robert bork, professor john harrison, judge raymond randolph, and chief justice of the united states court of appeals of the sixth circuit. tonight, we're honored to add a fifth name to that prestigious list as a welcome justice anthony kennedy. justice kennedy received his bachelor of arts degree from stanf
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 2:00pm EST
minutes? >> a 10-minute break but please. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> now we will continue our discussion about china and its relationship with the united states. panelists talked about the interdependence of the two countries' economies and foreign policy issues with syria and russia. this is just over an hour. >> i am going to be very brief in introducing our two panelists. i think they are -- i am also going to be in the discussion, for which jonathan promised me two cookies instead of one, for doing double duty. i am not going to say anything substantive about this panel other than looking at the u.s. side of things and the regional side of things, they mesh very well and they also mesh with the first panel. i think we all know jeffrey. the founding director of the thornton center and the senior director at the nfc under president obama for the first two plus years i guess. he has written, by the way, a wonderful book accounting that time, which i think is probably available in t
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 2:00pm EST
today and talk a little bit about are the strategic economic choices facing the nation. what does that mean? we talk about strategy and economics, is there something more fundamental about the way the united states is positioned in the world and its choices? michael has his own followers and accolades. jeff bingaman and i and our whole staff were riveted from much of his staff and guidance at the time. had he moved in along some of the issues we're talking about back then, the united states might not be in the same position. to his left, we have the smart guy who would have evolved from a would have come in that we could have seen as national security adviser. his deputy secretary the treasury under bush. he is a senior foreign policy ambassador to adjourn year -- germany and one of the few people who synthesizes the economic and the national security in such a holistic way. his dad was a famous democrat and was one of the reasons i moved to washington. to michael's right, we have doug holtz-eakin. he ran the congressional budget office and he is a very distinguished economists. e
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 7:00pm EST
. the pledge allegiance says one nation under god, indivisible, so that the country is indivisible. that is the hope for the country, as a unit. >> we want to remind our viewers we have a special line for people who have signed a petition to secede from the united states. our next call comes from michael and florida. he welcome to the program. are you there? >> i agree with paul. i think we should cut washington and send them adrift. >> what made you want to sign the petition? do really think that could happen? >> i think it can and i think it would be a good thing. we would not be tied up in all of the bureaucratic nonsense. >> would you see florida as becoming its own country? or maybe grouping with other states? >> the latter. host: we had a war over that. caller: we won. host: which way would that be? mike, you still there? we had a war over that and did not turn out too well for the guys trying to secede. be ok thishink it'll time. professor? guest: it is interesting that the states got to get there, and the mind -- may not be contiguous. it might be florida and texas would fo
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6